Peppermint fridge tart recipe

Peppermint fridge tart recipe

Hey guys, thanks for coming to take a look at my latest post which is super easy and yummy – two words which I think, all of us LOVE to hear.

Fridge tarts are the best for those who are a bit apprehensive about making desserts which require time in the oven, so I am thinking maybe I will load a few more of my favourites.

Peppermint tart is a classic South African dish and I doubt there is any person who can resist a bite…

Ingredients:

  • 1 packet tennis biscuits
  • Approximately 2 tablespoons butter
  • 250 ml fresh cream
  • 1 tin caramel treat
  • 1 tablespoon icing sugar
  • 1 giant slab of Peppermint Crisp Chocolate

Method:

Empty the tennis biscuits into a plastic packet and beat the shizz out of it until all the biscuits are broken and crumbly, once done place in your serving dish.

In a little bowl/cup melt the butter and add the melted butter to the crushed biscuits, incorporating the butter evenly and patting down until a solid base is formed. You can then set this aside.

In a separate bowl whisk the cream until stiff or stiff-ish – I added sugar to the cream, as I prefer a slightly sweeter whipped cream flavour but you can leave out the sugar completely, it doesn’t make a huge difference.

Next add the entire tin of caramel and fold into the whipped cream. Chop up half of the chocolate slab and add to the caramel and cream mixture.

Once all is incorporated, spread the mixture onto your biscuit base and sprinkle the remainder of the chocolate onto the top. Refrigerate for 30 minutes – 1 hour and serve!

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Easy Roti’s (Indian Flatbreads)

Easy Roti’s (Indian Flatbreads)

The past two Sundays’ I found myself making curries, the first Sunday butter chikeeen and the next a lekke lamb curry.

I love me some roti’s hey, the feeling of eating with my hands and smothering the pastry in the curry sauce is just so good. Also after seeing one of my high school friends post her homemade rotis on Insta I had to try.

I used to have a cool connection that made real, authentic, buttery, melt in your mouth roti’s that I could freeze and use as I needed to. I am assuming the more complicated recipes are the most authentic, where the butter is folded and rolled into the dough. The recipe I found is less time consuming, however I will try the original version sometime.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour (not self raising)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 2/3 cup water

Method:

In a bowl mix together the flour and salt. Add the melted butter. I used my hands for this part but you can use a fork to mix the flour and butter together until the consistency resembles crumbs. Add the water a bit at a time, stirring as you go along.

Once the dough pulls away from the bowl and is not super sticky (add more flour if too sticky), remove from the bowl and on a floured surface knead for about 6 – 8 minutes. Once done, divide the dough into approximately 6 balls.

Switch on the stove top and heat up your pan (high heat). While the pan is heating up start rolling out 1 of the balls very thinly – use flour to prevent the dough from sticking to your rolling surface. Also try and roll the dough into a size that it fits nicely into the pan. I rolled mine too big and the sides were a bit raw on the first try.

The recipe I found says to add butter to the pan each time before adding one of the roti’s to give it that buttery taste and soft texture. I tried it this way – and it definitely works, but I also tried it without adding butter to the pan and the roti turned out good however not as golden brown and not as soft.

I know at Food Inn and Easter Bazaar in the CBD they add the melted butter and garlic once the roti is removed from the oven so I am guessing you can do this also – Let me know?

Add the rolled out dough to the pan, it should take about 30 seconds before you need to flip it to the other side until nice and golden brown.

You can toss it as many times to get the desired colour and until the flatbread is cooked properly. You will know when to flip as the side facing the heat will form bubbles and turn brown.

Roti.jpg

Also let me know if you would like me to post any of my curry recipes and I will gladly do so – I use so many spices that I haven’t posted any of these recipes yet.

Love

M

 

Rant: The Good Food and Wine Show

Rant: The Good Food and Wine Show

I think my luck has changed back into the green! I won tickets to the Good Food and Wine Show (GFWS) thanks to @CapeArgus and Lance Witten for the headsup on his Twitter account.

A few years back I attended the event, I know it was fun because I cannot remember much due to the countless tastings we glugged down. This year however, I did not have the same experience maybe because I’m not 23 anymore? Here are my hits and misses of the event:

HITS:

  • I got to meet Reza and take a picture, yes the Spice Prince of India! (I love his show).

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  • Got some real schmancy looking wine glasses for R 150.00 which is a steal – retails for R 300.00.

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  • Someone proposed on stage while J’Something was performing which was real sweet to watch.

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  • Found Jack Parow’s own hand crafted brandy – and it was surprisingly good.

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MISSES:

  • My ticket didn’t include a glass – ended up paying R 60.00, R 60.00! for one glass.

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  • The glass included 7 “tasting coupons which really didn’t matter; the exhibitors didn’t want them or know about them?

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  • The venue was packed, it was difficult to take pictures or walk around with a full glass of anything. This put us off from wanting to walk around or stand in line to try something new.

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  • Maybe it was the time of day but the exhibitors weren’t the friendliest – could be fatigue?
  • Big wine farms weren’t on show i.e. Webersburg, Backsberg etc.
  • The GFWS was the same weekend as The Wacky Wine Festival – WHY!

In the end it was an experience even though I feel a bit disappointed in the event. I tried some interesting pestos and chilli sauces, there were plenty of food options – but carrying around so many items and trying to find a place to sit down and eat would of been a nightmare. I believe in second chances so will try again next year!

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